International Women's Day

All these books, whether fiction or non-fiction, are about inspiring and unforgettable women.

Little Leaders: Visionary Women Around the World by Vashti Harrison

Did you know that WIFI was invented by a glamorous Hollywood star? Or that the first computer programmer was a woman born in 1816? In the follow up to her beloved debut Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History, Vashti Harrison introduces little readers to even more trailblazing women, from writers to inventors, artists to scientists. These amazing little leaders have changed the world, all because they were talented, clever, and above all, determined. Discover inspirational heroines like Zaha Hadid, Frida Kahlo and Chien-Shiung Wu. With beautiful illustrations and incredible stories, this is the perfect book for every future leader.

Matilda by Roald Dahl

Matilda Wormwood's father thinks she's a little scab. Matilda's mother spends all afternoon playing bingo. And Matilda's headmistress Miss Trunchbull? Well, she's the worst of all. She is a big bully, who thinks all her pupils are rotten and locks them in the dreaded Chokey. As for Matilda, she's an extraordinary little girl with a magical mind - and now she's had enough. So all these grown-ups had better watch out, because Matilda is going to teach them a lesson they'll never forget.

"A true genius . . . Roald Dahl is my hero" - David Walliams

My Mum Tracy Beaker by Jacqueline Wilson, Nick Sharratt

Jacqueline Wilson is one of the most loved authors for a reason. Her characters never needed a cape, or a special power to be a hero to generations of children; just huge imaginations, a bit of fierceness and a big heart. And there is no hero fiercer or more iconic than Tracy. My Mum Tracy Beaker is a fantastic new story, reuniting readers with a much-loved old friend (and some old enemies. . .) Just like old times, it’s packed full of illustrations from Nick Sharratt.

The Extraordinary Life of Michelle Obama

She is a role model and feminist icon. Born and raised in Chicago, she studied and worked hard to become a lawyer, and then took to the international stage as First Lady. This beautifully illustrated biography tells the extraordinary story of Michelle Obama's life, perfect for young readers everywhere.

Malala's Magic Pencil by Malala Yousafzai, Kerascoët (Illustrator)

As a child in Pakistan, Malala made a wish for a magic pencil that she could use to redraw reality. She would use it for good; to give gifts to her family, to erase the smell from the rubbish dump near her house. (And to sleep an extra hour in the morning.) As she grew older, Malala wished for bigger and bigger things. She saw a world that needed fixing. And even if she never found a magic pencil, Malala realized that she could still work hard every day to make her wishes come true. This beautifully illustrated picture book tells Malala's story, in her own words, for a younger audience and shows them the worldview that allowed her to hold on to hope and to make her voice heard even in the most difficult of times.

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

The four March sisters sweep everyone up in their adventures – including Laurie, the boy next door. Despite their sisterly squabbles, the bond between them is strong, but as they strive to become independent young women their lives follow very different paths. Author Louisa May Alcott was born in 1832 and grew up in Concord, Massachusetts. Like her fictional character Jo March, she struggled against society’s expectations of young women of that era. She became a staunch feminist and never married – unwilling to make the sacrifices to her career that marriage would entail – and, as a fervent supporter of women’s suffrage, was the first woman to register to vote in Concord. Louisa May Alcott was a prolific author, writing industriously right up until her death in 1888.